Course curriculum

  • 1

    Module 1: How Britain became a Nation of Tea Drinkers

    • Pre-course reading and recommendations

    • Understanding Afternoon Tea

    • Introduction to Module 1

    • Module handout: Lessons 1-7

  • 2

    Module 1, Lesson 1: Tea first arrives in Europe

    • The Portuguese and Dutch Establish Trade with China

    • East India Company Ships Carry Tea from China

    • Tea Arrives in London

    • Thomas Garraway

    • Revision: Lesson 1

  • 3

    Module 1, Lesson 2: Tea for Royalty and Aristocrats

    • 1662: The Influence of Royalty

    • Tea Drinking in Aristocratic Homes

    • 17th Century: the Closet at Ham House

    • Revision: Lesson 2

  • 4

    Module 1, Lesson 3: The English Tea Ceremony develops

    • Learning to Drink Tea from the Chinese

    • How the English Brewed and Drank their Tea

    • What's on the Tea Table

  • 5

    Module 1, Lesson 4: 18th Century - Tea becomes an Upper Class luxury

    • A Symbol of Wealth and Status

    • Family Portraits Round the Tea Table

    • Tea after Dinner

    • Revision: Lessons 3 and 4

  • 6

    Module 1, Lesson 5: Tea for the poorer classes

    • Tea For the Poorer Classes

    • Smuggled tea

    • How to Smuggle Tea

    • Adulterated Tea

    • Revision: Lesson 5

  • 7

    Module 1, Lesson 6: Tea as part of British social life

    • 18th Century Pleasure Gardens

    • Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens

  • 8

    Module 1, Lesson 7: The British start growing tea in India

    • Trouble Brewing with China

    • The British Start Growing Tea in India

    • The First British Tea Gardens in Assam

    • Expansion of British Tea Gardens in India and Sri Lanka

    • British-grown tea

    • Revision: Lesson 7

  • 9

    Module 2: The Beginning of Afternoon Tea

    • Introduction to Module 2

    • Module handout Lessons 1-9

  • 10

    Module 2, Lesson 1: Tea fills a gap

    • Cups of Tea in the Afternoon

    • The Introduction of Luncheon

    • The Duchess of Bedford

    • Fanny Kemble

    • Revision: Lesson 1

  • 11

    Module 2, Lesson 2: Victorian Tea Parties

    • Upper Class Tea Parties

    • Tea Etiquette Develops

    • A Victorian Family Afternoon Tea

    • Tea in the Garden

    • Revision: Lesson 2

  • 12

    Module 2, Lesson 3: Afternoon Tea for all classes

    • The Growth of the Middle Classes

    • Afternoon Tea Crosses the Class Barrier

    • Middle Class Afternoon Tea

    • Victorian Middle Class Afternoon Tea

    • Victorian Afternoon Tea in the Countryside

    • Black Tea For the British

    • Revision: Lesson 3

  • 13

    Module 2, Lesson 4: Fashion and Afternoon Tea

    • Dressing For Tea

    • Tea Gowns

    • Late 19th Century Tea Gowns

    • Early 20th Century Tea Gowns

    • 1920s and 30s Tea Gowns

    • Revision: Lesson 4

  • 14

    Module 2, Lesson 5: Temperance, Tearooms and Women's Suffrage

    • Temperance, Tea and Tearooms

    • The First Tearoom in London

    • Out to Tea

    • Country Tearooms

    • Tea and Women's Suffrage

    • Suffragist Teaware

    • Revision: Lesson 5

  • 15

    Module 2, Lesson 6: Tea Dances

    • Dancing at Teatime

    • Tango Tea Dances

    • 1920s Tango Tea Dances

    • Tea Dances Today

    • Revision: Lesson 6

  • 16

    Module 2, Lesson 7: Three different tea occasions

    • Three different Tea Occasions

    • Afternoon Tea

    • High Tea

    • Cream Tea

    • Revision: Lesson 7

  • 17

    Module 2, Lesson 8: 20th Century Afternoon Tea

    • Hotels

    • The Waldorf Hotel, London

    • Lyons and Bettys

    • Palm Courts

    • Country Tearooms

    • Revision: Lesson 8

  • 18

    Module 2, Lesson 9: Afternoon Tea Today

    • Afternoon Tea More Popular Than Ever

    • Prêt-à-Portea

    • Prêt-à-Portea: The Dior Couture Collection

    • Cinderella

    • Art Deco

    • Chelsea Flower Show

    • Games

    • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    • London

    • Valentine's

    • Science

    • Mad Hatter

    • Mary Poppins

    • Van Gough

    • London Bus Tour

    • Thames Cruise

    • Revision: Lesson 9

  • 19

    Module 3: British Tea Wares and how they Developed

    • Introduction to Module 3

    • Module handout lessons 1-8

  • 20

    Module 3, Lesson 1: The Teapot

    • The Teapot in the 17th Century

    • Earthenware Teapots in the 17th and 18th Century

    • Porcelain Teapots in the 17th and 18th Century

    • Porcelains from Jingdezhen

    • English copies of Chinese pots

    • Chinese Teapots in Unusual Forms

    • English Teapots in Unusual Forms

    • Revision: Lesson 1

  • 21

    Module 3, Lesson 2: Tea Bowls

    • Chinese Tea Bowls

    • Blue and White

    • Not Just Blue and White

    • Japanese Tea Bowls

    • English Pottery copies Oriental designs

    • Tea Bowls Acquire a Handle

    • Revision: Lesson 2

  • 22

    Module 3, Lesson 3: Tea Storage

    • Tea Jars

    • Silver Tea Jars

    • Tea Jars become Tea Canisters

    • Fruit-shaped Canisters

    • Tea Caddies

    • Tea Chests

    • Revision: Lesson 3

  • 23

    Module 3, Lesson 4: Tea Sets and Silver

    • The Start of Matching Teaware

    • Bread and Butter with Tea

    • The Full Tea Set

    • Silver Tea Wares

    • Silver Kettles

    • Silver Urns

    • The display of tea things

    • Revision: Lesson 4

  • 24

    Module 3, Lesson 5: Tea Tables

    • The First Tea Tables

    • Tray-Tables

    • Pie-Crust Tea Tables

    • Tilt-Top Tea Tables

    • Pembroke Tea-Tables

    • The Teapoy

    • Revision: Lesson 5

  • 25

    Module 3, Lesson 6: Tea Spoons

    • Caddy Spoons

    • Sugar Nippers

    • Teaspoons

    • The Etiquette of the Spoon

    • Mote Spoons, Strainers and Bells

    • Revision: Lesson 6

  • 26

    Module 3, Lesson 7: Milk Jugs and Creamers

    • Tea Without Milk

    • Milk in Tea

    • Why Add Milk?

    • Milk Jugs and Creamers

    • The Cow Creamer

    • Tea Sets

    • Revision: Lesson 7

  • 27

    Module 3, Lesson 8: Cake Stands, Cutlery, Cosies and Tea Hampers

    • Cake Stands

    • Tea Knives, Spoons etc.

    • Pastry Forks

    • Muffin Dishes and Muffineers

    • Tea Cosies

    • Tea Hampers

    • Revision: Lesson 8

  • 28

    Module 4: The Etiquette of Afternoon Tea

    • Introduction to Module 4

    • Module handout lessons 1-6

  • 29

    Module 4, Lesson 1: Two Ways of Arranging a Tea Party

    • Two ways of Arranging a Tea Party

    • Guests seated in Armchairs and Sofas

    • Gentlemen Guests

    • Guests seated around a table

  • 30

    Module 4, Lesson 2: Hosting an Afternoon Tea Party

    • Guests seated in Armchairs and Sofas

    • Guests seated around the Dining Table

  • 31

    Module 4, Lesson 3: How to Set the Table - Do's and Dont's

    • Side Plates

    • Cups, Saucers and Spoons

    • Placing the Cup and Saucer

    • Napkins

    • Tea Knives and Pastry Forks

    • The Cake Stand

    • How NOT to Set the Table: Example 1

    • How NOT to Set the Table: Example 2

    • How NOT to set the table: Example 3

    • How NOT to set the table: Example 4

    • Revision: Lesson 1, 2 & 3

  • 32

    Module 4, Lesson 4: Etiquette for the Host

    • When Guests Arrive

    • The Tea: what to offer

    • When to Serve the Tea

  • 33

    Module 4, Lesson 5: Etiquette for Everyone

    • An Invitation to Tea

    • Dressing Appropriately

    • Gifts

    • How to Use the Napkin

    • How to Hold your Cup and Saucer

    • When to Add Milk

    • Sugar in Tea

    • How to Stir your Tea

    • Lemon in Tea

    • Revision: Lesson 4 & 5

  • 34

    Module 4, Lesson 6: Afternoon Tea Foods

    • Victorian Beginnings

    • Afternoon Tea Foods Today

    • The Sandwiches

    • Other Savouries

    • Clean Plates

    • The Scones

    • Clotted Cream

    • The Jam and Cream for the Scones

    • How to Eat Scones with Jam and Clotted Cream

    • How NOT to Serve and Eat Scones

    • Devon and Cornwall

    • Pastries and Cakes

    • Saying 'Thank You'

    • Revision: Lesson 6

  • 35

    Book your Q&A session

    • Optional Question & Answer session with Jane Pettigrew